Ethernet Cat5 Cat6 Cat7 Cables: What are the Differences?

 

Different Ethernet Categories


Ethernet cabling differences can be invisible to the casual observer. However, each new generation introduces copper pairs with tighter twists and more complex sheathing. Many earlier Ethernet generation cables have become obsolete.

 

Category 3


Cat3 cable is an earlier generation of Ethernet but can still be seen in older deployments. With the ability to support a maximum frequency of 16 MHz, this type of Ethernet can still be used for two-line telephone systems and 10BASE-T networks. CAT3 cable can also be used for alarm system installation or similar applications. CAT3 cable can have 2, 3, or 4 copper pairs (though uncommon). Category 5e cable, however, has become the default Ethernet category of choice with the ability to support faster speeds and frequencies.

 

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WIFI WPA2 Protocol Vulnerability

 

For years we've all depended on the WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access) protocol to secure our Wi-Fi networks. 

Security researcher Mathy Vanhoef has revealed what he has labeled KRACK, an exploit that attacks a vulnerability in the handshake of the WPA2 protocol that you most likely use to protect your Wi-Fi at home and millions of small businesses around the world use, too.

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Mac malware: OSX/Dok

 

The days of malware being just a problem for Windows users are long gone, with malicious software now appearing for all major operating systems. The latest, and most dangerous to hit the Mac yet, is called OSX/Dok. It targets any and all versions of Mac OS X and will take complete control of your Mac if you let it.

First the good news: in order for Dok to infect a Mac the user needs to open a .zip archive attached to an email. Most people's suspicions will be raised as soon as they see the Dokument.zip archive attached to an email they don't recognize. Those that don't are in for some pain.

According to Check Point, Dok is not currently detected on VirusTotal, meaning it won't get picked up by any security software run on your system (this will likely change quickly). Dok also uses a developer ceritificate that is signed and therefore authenticated by Apple, meaning your Mac will allow it to install and Gatekeeper is on no help.

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